DAY 95… Update

July 22nd, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink


Updated July 22 at 12:20 am:
 The Gaza health ministry has confirmed the deaths of 590 Palestinians so far in the besieged strip since Israel began its relentless assault on July 8. Among those killed, at least 154 were aged 18 or younger.

On Sunday, 74 people were killed in al-Shujayeh, a neighborhood east of Gaza City. According to sources in Gaza’s health ministry, 80 percent of the people killed were children under the age of 18, women, and elderly.

The youngest victim so far has been five-month-old Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, killed by Israeli tank shelling in Rafah. The next two youngest victims were both 18 months old: Mohammed Malakiyeh was killed along with his 27-year-old mother, and Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour was killed along with a member of her family in Khan Younis. The three oldest victims were all 80 years old. Naifeh Farjallah was killed in an air strike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City, and Saber Sukkar was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou succumbed on Sunday to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.

Victims’ names and ages were compiled based on information released by the Gaza health ministry, while the circumstances of the deaths were taken from the ministry and local news sources. You can find continuous updates at al-Jazeera:gaza

Gaza – the port

Tuesday, July 8:
1. Mohammed Sha’aban, 24, was killed in a bombing of his car in Gaza City.
2. Ahmad Sha’aban, 30, died in the same bombing.
3. Khadir al-Bashiliki, 45, died in the same bombing.
4. Rashad Yaseen, 27, was killed in a bombing of the Nusseirat refugee camp in central Gaza.
5. Riad Mohammed Kawareh, 50, was killed in a bombing of his family’s home in Khan Younis.
6. Seraj Ayad Abed al-A’al, 8, was wounded in the same bombing and succumbed to his injuries on Tuesday evening.
7. Mohammed Ayman Ashour, 15, died in the same bombing.
8. Bakr Mohammed Joudah, 22, died in the same bombing.
9. Ammar Mohammed Joudah, 26, died in the same bombing.
10. Hussein Yousef Kawareh, 13, died in the same bombing.
11. Mohammed Ibrahim Kawareh, 50, died in the same bombing.
12. Bassim Salim Kawareh, 10, died in the same bombing.
13. Mousa Habib, 16, from Gaza City’s al-Shujaiyah neighborhood, was killed along with his 22-year old cousin while the pair were riding a motorcycle.
14. Mohammed Habib, 22, was killed with Mousa Habib.
15. Sakr Aysh al-Ajouri, 22, was killed in an attack on Jabalia, in northern Gaza.
16. Ahmad Na’el Mehdi, 16, from Gaza City’s Sheikh Radwan neighborhood, was killed in a bombing that wounded two of his friends.
17. Hafiz Mohammed Hamad, 30, an Islamic Jihad commander, was killed in the bombing of his home in Beit Hanoun, along with five of his family members.
18. Ibrahim Mohammed Hamad, 26, died in the same bombing.
19. Mehdi Mohammed Hamad, 46, died in the same bombing.
20. Fawzia Khalil Hamad, 62, died in the same bombing.
21. Dunia Mehdi Hamad, 16, died in the same bombing.
22. Suha Hamad, 25, died in the same bombing.
23. Suleiman Salman Abu Soaween, 22

Wednesday, July 9:
24. Abdelhadi Jamaat al-Sufi, 24, was killed in a bombing near the Rafah crossing.
25. Naifeh Farjallah, 80, was killed in an airstrike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City.
26. Abdelnasser Abu Kweek, 60, was killed in the bombing of Gaza’s central governorate along with his son.
27. Khaled Abu Kweek, 31, Abdelnasser Abu Kweek’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
28. Mohammed Areef, 13, died in a bombing in Sha’af.
28. Amir Areef, 10, died in the same bombing.
30. Mohammed Malakiyeh, 18 months old, died in a bombing along with his mother and a young man.
31. Hana Malakiyeh, 27, Mohammed Malakiyeh’s mother, died in the same bombing.
32. Hatem Abu Salem, 28, died in the same bombing.
33. Mohammed Khaled al-Nimri, 22
34. Sahar Hamdan, 40, died in the bombing of her home in Beit Hanoun.
35. Ibrahim Masri, 14, Sahar Hamdan’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
36. Mahmoud Nahid al-Nawasra was killed in a bombing in al-Meghazi.
37. Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra, 4, was killed in the same bombing and arrived at the hospital “in shreds.”
38. Nidal Khalaf al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 5, was killed in the same bombing.
39. Salah Awwad al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 6, was killed in the same bombing. His body was found under the rubble of the house.
40. Aisha Nijm al-Meghazi, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
41. Amal Youssef Abdel Ghafour, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
42. Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour, an 18-month-old girl, was killed in the same bombing.
43. Rashid al-Kafarneh, 30, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was bombed.
44. Ibrahim Daoud al-Balawi, 24
45. Abdelrahman Jamal al-Zamli, 22
46. Ibrahim Ahmad Abideen, 42
47. Mustafa Abu Mar, 20
48. Khalid Abu Mar, 23
49. Mazen Farj al-Jarbah, 30, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
50. Marwan Slim, 27, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
51. Hani Saleh Hamad, 57, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun along with his son Ibrahim.
52. Ibrahim Hamad, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
53. Salima Hassan Musallim al-Arja, 60, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded five others.
54. Maryam Atieh Mohammed al-Arja, 11, was killed in the same bombing.
55. Hamad Shahab, 37
56. Ibrahim Khalil Qanun, 24, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
57. Mohammed Khalil Qanun, 26, was killed in the same attack.
58. Hamdi Badieh Sawali, 33, was killed in the same attack.
59. Ahmad Sawali, 28, was killed in the same attack.
60. Suleiman Salim al-Astal, 55, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
61. Mohammed al-Aqqad, 24
62. Ra’ed Shalat, 37, was killed in a bombing that wounded 6 others.

hospital-6

Al-Shifa hospital

Thursday, July 10:
63. Asma Mahmoud al-Hajj, 22, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that killed eight members of the same family and wounded 16 other people.
64. Basmah Abdelfattah al-Hajj, 57, was wounded in the bombing and succumbed to her injuries shortly afterwards.
65. Mahmoud Lutfi al-Hajj, 58, died in the same bombing.
66. Tarek Mahmoud al-Hajj, 18, died in the same bombing.
67. Sa’ad Mahmoud al-Hajj, 17, died in the same bombing.
68. Najla Mahmoud al-Hajj, 29, died in the same bombing.
69. Fatima Mahmoud al-Hajj, 12, died in the same bombing.
70. Omar Mahmoud al-Hajj, 20, died in the same bombing.
71. Ahmad Salim al-Astal, 24, was killed in the bombing of a beach house in Khan Younis that critically wounded more than 15 people.
72. Mousa Mohammed al-Astal, 50, was killed in the same bombing. The two bodies were recovered four hours after the bombing.
73. Ra’ed al-Zawareh, 33, succumbed to his wounds and died. The location of his death was unreported.
74. Baha’ Abu al-Leil, 35, was killed in a bombing.
75. Salim Qandil, 27, was killed in the same bombing.
76. Omar al-Fyumi, 30, was killed in the same bombing.
77. Abdullah Ramadan Abu Ghazzal, 5, was killed in a bombing in Beit Lahiya.
78. Ismail Hassan Abu Jamah, 19, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that injured two children, one critically.
79. Hassan Awda Abu Jamah, 75, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
80. Mohammed Ahsan Ferwanah, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
81. Yasmin Mohammed Mutawwaq, 4 was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
82. Mahmoud Wulud, 26, was killed in a bombing of a civilian vehicle in northern Gaza. His remains were taken to Kamal Adwan Hospital in Jabalia.
83. Hazem Balousha, 30, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
84. Nour Rafik Adi al-Sultan, 27, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
85. Ahmad Zaher Hamdan, 24, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
86. Mohammed Kamal al-Kahlout, 25, was killed in a bombing in Jabalia.
87. Sami Adnan Shaldan, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
88. Jamah Atieh Shalouf, 25, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
89. Bassem Abdelrahman Khattab, 6, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
90. Abdullah Mustafa Abu Mahrouk, 22, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.

Friday, July 11:
91. Anas Rizk Abu al-Kas, 33, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
92. Nour Marwan al-Najdi, 10, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
93. Mohammed Mounir Ashour, 25, was killed in a bombing on the al-Ghanam family home in Rafah.
94. Ghalia Deeb Jabr al-Ghanam, 7, was killed in the same bombing.
95. Wasim Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 23, was killed in the same bombing.
96. Mahmoud Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 26, was killed in the same bombing.
97. Kifah Shahada Deeb al-Ghanam, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
98. Ra’ed Hani Abu Hani, 31, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
99. Shahraman Ismail Abu al-Kas, 42, was killed in a bombing in a refugee camp in central Gaza.
100. Mazen Mustafa Aslan, 63, was killed in the same bombing.
101. Mohammed Rabih Abu Humeidan, 65, was killed in shelling that struck northern Gaza.
102. Abdel Halim Ashra, 54, was killed in an airstrike on Wednesday in the area of Birka Deir al-Balah, but his body wasn’t discovered until Friday.
103. Saher Abu Namous, 3, was killed in an airstrike on his home in northern Gaza.
104. Hussein al-Mamlouk, 47, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
105. Saber Sukkar, 80, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
106. Nasser Rabih Mohammed Samamah, 49, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.

Saturday, July 12:
107. Rami Abu Massaad, 23, was killed in a strike on Deir al-Balah.
108. Mohammed al-Samiri, 24, was killed in the same attack.
109. Houssam Deeb al-Razayneh, 39, was killed in an attack on Jabalia.
110. Anas Youssef Kandil, 17, was killed in the same bombing.
111. Abdel Rahim Saleh al-Khatib, 38, was killed in the same bombing.
112. Youssef Mohammed Kandil, 33, was killed in the same bombing.
113. Mohammed Idriss Abu Saninah, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
114. Hala Wishahi, 31, was killed in an attack on the Mabarra association for the disabled in Jabalia.
115. Suha Abu Saade, 38, was killed in the same attack.
116. Ali Nabil Basal, 32, was killed in a strike on western Gaza City.
117. Mohammed Bassem al-Halabi, 28, was killed in the same strike.
118. Mohammed al-Sowayti (Abu Askar), 20, was killed in the same strike.
119. Ibrahim Nabil Humaide, 30, was killed in a bombing in the Tufah neighborhood in eastern Gaza City.
120. Hassan Ahmed Abu Ghoush, 24, was killed in the same attack.
121. Ahmed Mahmoud al-Ballaoui, 26, was killed in the same attack.
122. Ratib Sabahi al-Sifi, 22, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with five others.
123. Azmi Mahmoud Abid, 51, was killed in the same attack.
124. Nidal Mahmoud Abu al-Malish, 22, was killed in the same attack.
125. Suleiman Said Abid, 56, was killed in the same attack.
126. Ghassan Ahmad al-Masri, 25, was killed in the same attack.
127. Mustafa Mohammed Anaieh, 58, was killed in the same attack.
128. Rafa’at Youssef Amer, 36, succumbed to wounds sustained in a bombing in Gaza City.
129. Ghazi Mustafa Areef, 62, died when his home in Gaza City was bombed. His son sustained serious injuries.
130. Mohammed Adriss Abu Sulim, 20, was killed in a bombing in Jabaliya.
131. Fadi Yaqub Sakr, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
132. Qassem Jaber Adwan Awdeh, 16, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
133. Mohammed Ahmad Bassal, 19, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
134. Muhannad Youssef Dhahir, 23, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
135. Mahmoud Abdallah Shratiha, 53, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza.
136. Shadi Mohammed Zarb, 21, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded three others.
137. Imad Bassam Zarb, 21, was killed in the same bombing.
138. Nahid Ta’im al-Batash, 41, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with 16 family members. Dozens more were wounded in the same attack.
139. Baha Majid al-Batash, 28, was killed in the same bombing.
140. Qassi Isam al-Batash, 12, was killed in the same bombing.
141. Aziza Youssef al-Batash, 59 was killed in the same bombing.
142. Mohammed Isam al-Batash, 17 was killed in the same bombing.
143. Ahmad Naman al-Batash, 27 was killed in the same bombing.
144. Yahya Alaa al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
145. Jalal Majid al-Batash, 26 was killed in the same bombing.
146. Mahmoud Majid al-Batash, 22 was killed in the same bombing.
147. Marwa Majid al-Batash, 25 was killed in the same bombing.
148. Majid Subhi al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.
149. Khalid Majid al-Batash, 20 was killed in the same bombing.
150. Ibrahim Majid al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
151. Manar Majid al-Batash, 14 was killed in the same bombing.
152. Amal Hassan al-Batash, 49 was killed in the same bombing.
153. Anas Alaa al-Batash, 10 was killed in the same bombing.
154. Qassi Alaa al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.

Sunday, July 13:
155. Rami Abu Shanab, 25, succumbed to wounds sustained several days ago in Deir al-Balah.
156. Khawla al-Hawajri, 25, was killed in a bombing in Nusseirat.
157. Mohammed Ghazi Areef, 35, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
158. Ahmad Youssef Daloul, 47, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
159. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou, 80, succumbed to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.
160. Fawzia Abdela’el, 73, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
161. Haitham Ashraf Zarb, 21, succumbed to wounds sustained during an attack on Rafah on Saturday that killed two other members of the Zarb family.
162. Leila Hassan al-Awdat, 41, was killed in an attack on Meghazi that wounded four others.
163. Hussam Ibrahim al-Najjar, 14, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza. His remains were taken to Beit Hanoun Hospital.
164. Rawidah Abu Harb al-Zwaida, 31, was killed.
165. Samer Tallal Hamdan was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
166. Hussein Abd al-Qadir Muheisen, 19, succumbed to wounds sustained in Gaza City.
167. Maher Thabit Abu Mar, 24, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
168. Mohammed Salim Abu Bureis, 65, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
169. Saddam Moussa Moamar, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
170. Mousa Shehade Moamar, 60, was killed in Khan Younis.
171. Hanadi Hamadi Moamar, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
172. Adham Mohammed Abed el-Fatah Abed el-Al, was killed in Gaza.

Monday, July 14:
173. Qassem Tallal Hamdan, 23, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
174. Hamid Suleiman Abu al-Araj Deir al-Balah, 60.
175. Abdullah Mahmoud Barakah, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
176. Tamer Salem Kodeih, 37, was killed in Khan Younis.
177. Ziad Maher al-Najjar, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
178. Ziad Salem al-Shawi, 25, was killed in Rafah.
179. Mohammed Yasser Hamdan, 24, was killed in Gaza.
180. Mohammed Shakib al-Agha, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
181. Mohammed Younis Abu Youssif, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
182. Sara Omar Sheikh al-Eid, 4, was killed in Rafah.
183. Omar Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 24, was killed in Rafah.
184. Jihad Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 48, was killed in Rafah.
185. Kamal Ated Youssif Abu Taha, 16, was killed in Khan Younis.
186. Ismail Nabil Ahmad Abu Hatab, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.

Tuesday, July 15:
187. Ahmad Younis Abu Youssif, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
188. Bushra Khalil Zoarob, 53, was killed in Rafah.
189. Atwa Amira al-Maamour, 63, was killed in Khan Younis.
190. Ismail Salim al-Najjar, 46, was killed in Khan Younis.
191. Mohammed Ahmad Ibrahim al-Najjar, 49, was killed in Khan Younis.
192. Suleiman Abu Louli, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
193. Sobhi Abed el-Hamid Moussa, 77, was killed in Khan Younis.
194. Ismail Ftouh, 24, was killed in Gaza.
195. Saleh Said Dahliz Rafah, 20, was killed in Rafah.
196. Yasser Abed el-Mahmoun, 18, was killed in Rafah.
197. Ibrahim Khalil al-Asaafi, 66, was killed in Jiher el-Deek
198. Mohammed Abdullah al-Zahouk, 23, was killed in Rafah.
199. Mohammed Ismail Abu Awda, 27, was killed in Rafah.

Wednesday, July 16:
200. Mohammed Sabri al-Dibari, 20, was killed in Rafah.
201. Abdullah Mohammed Abdullah al-Irjani, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
202. Ahmad Adel Ahmad al-Niwajha, 23, was killed in Rafah.
203. Mohammed Tayseer Sharab, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
204. Farid Mohammed Abu Daqa, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
205. Ashraf Khalil Abu Shanab, 33, was killed in Rafah.
206. Khadra al-Abd Salama Abu Daqa, 65, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
207. Omar Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 24, was killed in the same attack.
208. Ibrahim Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 10, was killed in the same attack.
209. Abdelrahman Ibrahim Khalil al-Sarkhi, 37, was killed in an attack on Gaza City.
210. Ahed Atef Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
211. Zakaria Ahed Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
212. Mohammed Ramez Bakr, 11, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
213. Ismail Mohammed Bakr, 9, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
214. Hamza Ra’ed Thari, 6, succumbed to wounds sustained “a few days ago” and passed away.
215. Mohammed Akram Abu Amer, 34, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
216. Kamal Mohammed Abu Amer, 38, Mohammed’s brother, was reported seriously injured and then dead in the same attack.
217. Raqia al-Astal, 70, was killed in the bombing of a mosque in Khan Younis which killed at least three others and critically wounded several children.
218. Yasmin al-Astal, 4, was killed in the same attack.
219. Hussein Abdelnasser al-Astal, 23, was killed in the same attack.
220. Usama Mahmoud al-Astal, 6, was critically wounded in the same attack and succumbed to his wounds shortly afterwards.
221. Hossam Shamlakh, 23, succumbed to wounds sustained in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.
222. Mohammed Kamal Abdelrahman, 30, was killed in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.

Thursday, July 17:
223. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Qadim, 22, succumbed to wounds sustained in Deir al-Balah.
224. Zeinab Mohammed Saeed al-Abadleh, 70, died of her wounds in the Gaza European hospital.
225. Mohammed Abdelrahman Hassouneh, 67, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
226. Mohammed Ahmad al-Hout, 41, was killed in the same attack while on his way to morning prayers.
227. Ahmad Rihan, 23, was killed in an attack on North Gaza.
228. Salam Salah Fayyad, 25, succumbed to his wounds in a hospital in Gaza’s central province.
229. Abdallah al-Akhras, 27, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
230. Bashir Abd al-A’el, 20, was killed in the same attack.
231. Mohammed Ziyad Ghanem, 25, was killed in the same attack.
232. Fulla Tarek Shaheber, 8, was killed along with two child relatives in an airstrike on their home in Gaza City.
233. Jihad Issam Shaheber, 10, was killed in the same strike.
234. Wassim Issam Shaheber, 9, was killed in the same strike.
235. Yassin al-Humaideh, 4, died of wounds suffered in an earlier attack on Gaza City.
236. Rahaf Khalil al-Jabbour, 4, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
237. Hamza Houssam al-Abadaleh, 29, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
238. Abed Ali Natiz, 26, was killed in Gaza.
239. Mohammed Salem Natiz, 4, was killed in Gaza City.
240. Mohammed Shadi Natiz, 15, was killed in Gaza City.
241. Salah Salah al-Shafiai, was killed in Khan Younis.
242. Majdi Suleiman Salamah Jabarah, 22, was killed in Rafah.
243. Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, 5 months old, was killed in Rafah.

Friday, July 18:
244. Nassim Mahmoud Nassir was killed in an attack on Beit Hanoun.
245. Karam Mahmoud Nassir was killed in the same attack.
246. Omar Ayyad al-Mahmoum, 18, from Rafah, was killed in an attack on al-Shawka.
247. Salmiah Suleiman Ghayyad, 70, was killed in an attack east of Rafah.
248. Rami Saqqer Abu Tawila was killed in an attack east of Shujiyah that wounded 7 of his family members.
249. Hamad Abu Lahyia, 23, was killed in an attack east of Qarara that critically wounded several others.
250. Bassem Mohammed Mahmoud Madi, 22, was killed in an attack east of Rafah that wounded 11 others.
251. Mohammed Abdel Fattah Rashad Fayyad, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
252. Mahmoud Mohammed Fayyad, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
253. Bilal Mahmoud Radwan, 23, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
254. Mundhir Radwan, 22, was killed in the same attack.
255. Ahmad Fawzia Radwan, 23, was killed in the same attack.
256. Mahmoud Fawzia Radwan, 24, was killed in the same attack.
257. Ismail Youssef Taha Qassim, 59, was killed in an attack in Beit Hanoun that wounded 25 others.
258. Amal Khadir Ibrahim Badour, 40, was killed in the same attack.
259. Hani As’ad Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis that killed his nephew and wounded 4 others.
260. Mohammed Hamdan Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in the same attack.
261. Hussam Muslim Abu Eissa, 26, was killed in Jahr al-Dik.
262. Walaa Abu Ismail Muslim,12, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
263. Mohammed Abu Muslim, 13, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
264. Ahmad Abu Muslim, 14, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
265. Ahmed Abdullah al-Bahnasawi, 25, was killed in the village of Om al-Nasr in Gaza.
266. Saleh Zaghidi, 20, was killed in Rafah.
267. Alaa Abu Shbat, 23, was killed in Rafah.
268. Ahmed Hasan Saleh al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in al-Fakhari.
269. Hamada Abdallah al-Bashiti, 21, was killed in al-Fakhari.
270. Abdullah Jamal al-Samiri, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
271. Mahmoud Ali Darwish, 40, was killed in Nusseirat.
272. Wila al-Qara, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
273. Raafat Mohammed al-Bahloul, 35, was killed in Khan Younis.
274. Mohammed Awad Matar, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
275. Hamza Mohammed Abu al-Hussein, 27, was killed in Rafah.
276. Imad Hamed Alouwein, 7, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
277. Qassem Hamed Alouwein, 4, was killed in the same strike.
278. Sara Mohammed Boustan, 13, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
279. Rizk Ahmed al-Hayek, 2, was killed in Gaza City.
280. Mohammed Saad Mahmoud Abu Saade, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
281. Naim Moussa Abu Jarad, 24, was killed in tank shelling on his home in Beit Hanoun along with seven members of his family.
282. Abed Moussa Abu Jarad, 30, was killed in the same attack.
283. Siham Moussa Abu Jarad, 15, was killed in the same attack.
284. Rijaa Alyan Abu Jarad, 31, was killed in the same attack.
285. Ahlam Naim Abu Jarad, 13, was killed in the same attack.
286. Hania Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 3, was killed in the same attack.
287. Samih Naim Abu Jarad, 1, was killed in the same attack.
288. Moussa Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 6, was killed in the same attack.
289. Moustafa Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in an air strike on Rafah along with two relatives.
290. Imad Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in the same attack.
291. Nizar Fayez Abu Sanina, 38, was killed in the same attack.
292. Ghassan Salem Moussa, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
293. Mohammed Salem Shaat, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
294. Ahmed Salem Shaat, 22, was killed in the same attack.
295. Amjad Salem Shaat, 15, was killed in the same attack.
296. Mohamed Talal al-Sanaa, 20, was killed in Rafah.

Saturday, July 19:
297. Ayad Ismail al-Rakib, 26, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
298. Yehya Bassam al-Sirri, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
299. Mohammed Bassam al-Sirri, 17, was killed in the same attack.
300. Mahmoud Redda Salhia, 56, was killed in Khan Younis.
301. Moustafa Redda Salhia, 21, was killed in the same attack.
302. Mohammed Moustafa Salhia, 22, was killed in the same attack.
303. Wissam Redda Salhia, 15, was killed in the same attack.
304. Ibrahim Jamal Kamal Nasser, 13, was killed in Khan Younis.
305. Ahmed Mahmoud Hassan Aziz, 34, Khan Younis.
306. Said Ola Issa, 30, was killed in the central disrict.
307. Mohammed Awad Fares Nassar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
308. Mohammed Jihad al-Kara, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
309. Rashdi Khaled Nassar, 24, was killed in the same Khan Younis.
310. Raed Walid Likan, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
311. Raafat Ali Bahloul, 36, was killed in Khan Younis.
312. Bilal Ismail Abu Daqqah, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
313. Mohammed Ismail Samour, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
314. Ismail Ramadan al-Lawalhi, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
315. Mohammed Ziad al-Rahhel, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
316. Mohammed Ahmed Abu Zaanounah, 36, was killed in Gaza.
317. Mohammed Rafic al-Rahhel, 22, was killed in Beit Lahia.
318. Fadel Mohammed al-Banna, 29. was killed in Jbalia.
319. Mohammed Atallah Awdeh Saadat, 25, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
320. Mohammed Abedel Rahman Abu Hamad, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
321. Maali Abedel Rahman Suleiman Abu Zayed, 24, al-Wista.
322. Mahmoud Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 23, was killed in Beit Lahia.
323. Dalia Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
324. Ruaia Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
325. Nagham Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 2, was killed in Beit Lahia.
326. Amer Hamoudah, 7, was killed in Beit Lahia.
327. Mahmoud Rizk Mohammed Hamoudah, 18, was killed in Beit Lahia.
328. Mohammed Khaled Jamil al-Zuweidi, 20, was killed in Beit Lahia.
329. Mohammed Ahmad al-Saidi, 18, was killed in Khan Younis.
330. Abdel Rahman Mohammed Awdah Barak, 23, al-Wista.
331. Tarek Samir Khalil al-Hitto, 26, was killed in al-Wista.
332. Mahmoud al-Sharif, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
333. Mohammed Fathi al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
334. Mahmoud Anwar Abu Shabab, 16, was killed in Rafah.
335. Mo’men Taysir al-Abed Abu Dan, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
336. Abdel Aziz Samir Abu Zeiter, 31, was killed in al-Wista.
337. Mohammed Ziad Zaabout, 24, was killed in Gaza.
338. Hatem Ziadah Zaabout, 22, was killed in Gaza.
339. Ahmad Maher Mohammed Abu Thuria, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
340. Abdullah Ghazi Abdullah al-Masri, 30, was killed in al-Wista.
341. Ayman Hisham al-Naaouq, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
342. Akram Mahmoud al-Matwouk, 37, was killed in Jabalia.
343. Salem Ali Abu Saadah, was killed in Khan Younis.

Sunday, July 20:
344. Hosni Mahmoud al-Absi, 56, was killed in Rafah.
345. Mohammed Mahmoud Moamar, 30, was killed in Rafah,
346. Hamza Mahmoud Moamar, 21, was killed in Rafah.
347. Anas Mahmoud Moamar, 17, was killed in rafah.
348. Mohammed Ali Jundieh, 38, was killed in Gaza.
349. Mohammed Khalil al-Hayyah
350. Osama Khalil al-Hayyah
351. Khalil Osama al-Hayyah
352. Hala Saqer Abu Hin
353. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Wista.
354. Ahmad Tawfiq Zannoun, 26, was killed in Rafah.
355. Sohaib Ali Jomaa Abu Qoura, 21, was killed in Rafah.
356. Homeid Sobh Mohammed Abu Foujo, 22, was killed in Rafah.
357. Toufic Marshoud, 52, was killed in Gaza.
358. Ibrahim Khalil Abd Ammar, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
359. Ibrahim Salim Joumea al-Sahbani, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
360. Ibrahim Arrif Ibrahim al-Ghalayini, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
361. Osama Khalil Ismail al-Hayya, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
362. Osama Roubhi Shahta Ayyad, 31, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
363. Isra Yassir Atieh Hamidieh, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
364. Akram Mohammed Ali al-Skafi, 63, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
365. Iman Khalil Abed Ammar, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
366. Iman Mohammed Ibrahim Hamadeh, 40, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
367. Ahmad Ishaq Youssef al-Ramlawi, 33, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
368. Ahmad Sammi Diab Ayyad, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
369. Ahmad Mohammed Ahmad Abu Zanouna, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
370. Imama Isama Khalil al-Hayya, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
371. Talla Akram Ahmad al-Atwi, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
372. Tawfiq Ibrawi Salem Marshoud, 52, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
373. Hatim Ziad Ali al-Zabout, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
374. Khalid Riyad Mohammed Hamad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
375. Khadija Ali Moussa Shahadi, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
376. Khalil Osama Khalil al-Hayya, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
377. Khalil Salim Ibrahim Mousbah, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
378. Dima Adil Abdullah Aslim, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
379. Dina Rushdi Omar Hamadi, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
380. Rahaf Akram Ismail Abu Joumea, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
381. Saji Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
382. Samia Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 3, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
383. Soad Mohammed Abdel Razik al-Hallaq, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
384. Samar Osama Khalil al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.

Samar was the wife of Oxford Brookes graduate Hassan al-Hallaq, now in intensive care. She was pregnant, so the unborn child died with her, as well as two of their sons.
385. Shadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
386. Shireen Fathi Othman Ayyad, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
387. Adil Abdullah Salim Aslim, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
388. Assem Khalil Abed Ammar, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
389. Ahed Saed Moussa al-Sirsik, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
390. Ayisha Ali Mahmoud Zayid, 54, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
391. Abdelrahman Akram Mohammed al-Skafi, 22, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
392. Abdelrahman Abdelrazak Abdelrahman al-Shaykh Khalil, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
393. Abdullah Mansour Radwan Ammara, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
394. Abed Rabboh Ahmad Mohammed Zayid, 58, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
395. Isam Atieh Said al-Skafi, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
396. Ola Ziad Hassan Aslim, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
397. Alaa Jamal al-Din Mohammed Bourda, 35, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
398. Ali Mohammed Hassan al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
399. Omar Jamil Soubhi Hammouda, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
400. Ghada Soubhi Sa’adi Ayyad, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
401. Ghada Ibrahim Suleiman Udwan, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
402. Fadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
403. Fatima Abdelrahim Abdelqadir Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
404. Fida’a Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
405. Fahmi Abdelaziz Sa’ed Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
406. Qinan Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
407. Maysa Abdelrhaman Said al-Sirsawi, 37, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
408. Mohammed Ashraf Rafiq Ayyad, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
409. Mohammed Hassan Mohammad al-Skafi, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
410. Mohammed Rami Fathi Ayyad, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
411. Mohammed Ra’ed Ihsan Aqqila, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
412. Mohammed Ziad Ali al-Zabbout, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
413. Mohammed Mohammed Ali Muharrib Jundiyah, 38, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
414. Mohammed Hani Mohammad al-Halaq, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.

Palestinians flee the Shujayeh neighbourhood during heavy Israeli shelling in Gaza City

Fleeing al-Shujayeh

415. Marrah Shakil Ahmad al-Jammal, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
416. Marwan Mounir Saleh Qunfud, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
417. Marwa Salman Ahmad al-Sirsawi, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
418. Moussaeb al-Khayr Salah al-Din Said al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
419. Mona Suleiman Ahmad al-Sheikh Khalil, 49, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
420. Mona Abdelrahman Mahmoud Ayyad, 42, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
421. Nirmin Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
422. Hala Akram Hassan al-Hallaq, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
423. Hala Soubhi Saidi Ayyad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
424. Hala Saqr Hassan al-Hayya, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
425. Hani Mohammed Ahmad al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
426. Hiba Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
427. Youssef Ahmad Younis Mustafa, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
428. Youssef Salim Hamto Habib, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
429. Unknown
430. Mohammed Ayman al-Shaer, 5, was killed in Khan Younis.
431. Leila Hasan al-Shaer, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
432. Salah Saleh al-Shaer, in his forties, was killed in Khan Younis.
433. Hibatullah Akram al-Shaer, 7, was killed in Khan Younis.
434. Youssef Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 44, was killed in al-Barij.
435. Jamil Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 53, was killed in the same attack.
436. Sha’aban Jamil Ziyadeh, 12, was killed in the same attack.
437. Omar Sha’aban Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
438. Muftiya Mohammed Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
439. Bayyan Abdel Latif Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
440. Ismail al-Qurdi
441. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Muqadama, 30, was killed in the same attack.
442. Najah Sa’ad el-Din Daraji, 65, was killed in Rafah.
443. Abdullah Youssef Daraji, 3, was killed in the same attack.
444. Mohammed Baghdar al-Dughma, 20, was killed in Beni Soheileh.
445. Mohammed Raja’ Mohammed Handam, 15, was killed in Rafah.
446. Aya Bahjat Abu Sultan, 15, was killed in Beit Lahya.
447. Hani Mohammed al-Halaq, 29, was killed in al-Ramal.
448. Suad Mohammed al-Halaq, 62, was killed in the same attack.
449. Qinan Akram al-Halaq, 5, was killed in the same attack.
450. Samar Osama al-Halaq, 29, was killed in the same attack.
451. Saji al-Halaq was killed in the same attack.
452. Ibrahim Khalil Ammar was killed in the same attack.
453. Ahmad Yassin was killed in the same attack.
454. Rayan Taysir Abu Jamea, 8, was killed in Khan Younis.
455. Fatima Mahmoud Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
456. Sabah Tawfiq Mahmoud Abu Jamea, 38, was killed in the same attack.
457. Rozan Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 14, was killed in the same attack. Her body was recovered from the rubble on Monday.
458. Jawdat al-Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
459. Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 5, was killed in the same attack.
460. Haifa Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 9, was killed in the same attack.
461. Yasmin Ahmad Salama Abu Jamea, 25, was killed in the same attack.
462. Suheila Bassam Ahmad Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
463. Shahinaz Walid Ahmad Abu Jamea, 1, was killed in the same attack.
464. Hossam Hossam Abu Qaynas, 5, was killed in the same attack.
465. An unidentified woman was killed in the same attack.
466. An unidentified woman in her 30s was killed in the same attack.
467. An unidentified child was killed in the same attack.
468. Ahmad Suleiman Mahmoud Sahmoud, 34, was killed in the same attack.
469. Minwa Abdel Bassit Ahmad al-Sabea, 37, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
470. Mahmoud Moussa Abu Anzar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
471. Turkiyah al-Abed al-Biss
472. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
473. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
474. Abdullah Omar al-Maghribi was killed in Rafah.
475. Najah al-Maghribi was killed in the same attack.
476. Bassem al-Brayim was killed in Khan Younis.
477. Ra’ed Mansour Nayfeh was killed in Gaza City.
478. Fuad Jaber was killed in Gaza City.
479. Mohammed Mahmoud Hussein Moammar was killed in Rafah.
480. Hamza Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
481. Anas Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
482. Bilal Jaber Mohammed al-Ashhab, 22, was killed in al-Mughraqa.
483. An unidentified body was recovered along with Bilal.
484. Ra’ed Ismail al-Bardawil, 26, was killed in Rafah.
485. Unknown
486. Unknown
487. Unknown
488. Unknown
489. Unknown
490. Unknown
491. Unknown
492. Unknown

Monday, July 21:

493. Sumoud Nasr Siyam, 26, was killed in Rafah.
494. Mohammed Mahrous Salam Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
495. Badr Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
496. Ahmad Ayman Mahrous Siyam, 17, was killed in the same attack.
497. Mustafa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 12, was killed in the same attack.
498. Ghaydaa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
499. Shireen Mohammed Salam Siyam, 32, was killed in the same attack.
500. Dalal Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
501. Kamal Mahrous Salama Siyam, 27, was killed in the same attack.
502. Abdullah Trad Abu Hjeir, 16, al-Nusseirat.
503. Ahmad Moussa Shaykh al-Eid, 23, was killed in Rafah.
504. Zakariah Massoud al-Ashqar, 24, was killed in Gaza City.
505. Kamal Talal Hassan al-Masri, 22, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
506. Ra’ed Isam Daoud, 30, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
507. Fatima Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
508. Ahmad Mohammed Azzam, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
509. Mahmoud Hassan al-Nakhala was killed in Gaza.
510. Kamal Massoud, 21, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
511. Saleh Badawi, 31, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
512. Unidentified body in the Gaza European hospital.
513. Majdi Mahmoud al-Yazaji, 56, was killed in Gaza City.
514. Mohammed Samih al-Ghalban was killed in Gaza City.
515. Karam Ibrahim Atieh Barham, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
516. Nidal Ali Abu Daqqa, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
517. Nidal Joumea Abu Assi, 43, was killed in Khan Younis.
518. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
519. Mayar al-Yazaji, 2, was killed in al-Karama.
520. Yasmin al-Yazaji, was killed in the same attack.
521. Wajdi al-Yazaji, was killed in the same attack.
522. Safinaz al-Yazaji, was killed in the same attack.
523. Unidentified child, 5, was killed in the same attack.
524. Mahran Kamel Jondeyah, 32, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
525. Tamer Nayef Jondeyah, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
526. Rahma Ahmad Jondeyah, 50, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
527. Ibrahim Shaaban Bakroun, 37, was killed in al-Shaaf
528. Unidentified was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital.
529. Unidentified was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital.
530. Unidentified was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital.
531. Unidentified was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital.
532. Youssef Ghazi Hamidieh, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
533. Moataz Jamal Hamidieh, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
534. Aed Jamal Hamidieh, 21, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
535. Aya Yasser al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
536. Aesha Yasser al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
537. Nasma Iyad al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
538. Lamyaa Iyad al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
539. Israa al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
540. Yasmin al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
541. Arwa al-Qassas, was killed in Gaza city.
542. Aliaa al-Syam, was killed in Gaza city.
543. Fayza al-Syam was killed in Gaza city.
544. Soumaya al-Syam, was killed in Gaza city:
545. Fatima Ahmad al-Arja, was killed in Rafah.
546. Atieh Youssef Dardouna, 26, was killed in Jabalia.
547. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
548. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
549. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
550. Fadi Azmi Brayaem, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
551. Othman Salem Brayaem was killed in Deir al-Balah.
552. Salem Abdel Majeed Brayaem was killed in Deir al-Balah.
553. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza city.
554. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza city.
554. Ibrahim Dib Ahmad al-Kilani, 53, was killed in al-Wista.
555. Mahmoud Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 37, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
556. Yaser Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 8, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
557. Elias Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 4, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
558. Taghrid Shaaban Mohammed al-Kilani, 45, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
559. Sawsan Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 11, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
560. Rim Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 12, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
561. Aida Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 47, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
562. Soura Shaaban mohammed Derbas, 41, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
563. Yaseen Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 9, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
564. Inas Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 30, was killed in Bourj al-Salam.
565. Jihad Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
566. Fadi Bashir al-Abadleh, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
567. Unknown
568. Unknown
569. Unknown

Tuesday, July 22:

570. Wael Jamal Harb, 32, was killed in Gaza.
571. Hasan Khodor Bakr, 60, was killed in Gaza.
572. Mahmoud Suleiman Abu Sobha, 55, was killed in Khan Younis.
573. Abdullah Ismail al-Bahisi, 27, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
574. Misaab Saleh Salameh, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
575. Mohammed Nasr Haroun, 38, was killed in al-Nsayrat.
576. Naji Jamal al-Fajm, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
577. Ibtihal Ibrahim al-Rimahi, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
578. Youssef Ibrahim al-Rimahi, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
579. Iman Ibrahim al-Rimahi, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
580. Salwa Abu Monifi, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
581. Samira Abu Monifi, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
582. Haytham Samir al-Agha, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
583. Walid Suleiman Abu Daher, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
584. Yasmin Ahmad Abu Mor, 25, was killed in Rafah.
585. Sameh Zahir al-Sowafiri, 29, was killed in Rafah.
586. Mohammed Moussa Abu Fayad, 36, was killed in Rafah.
587. Fatima Hasan Azzam, 70, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
588. Maryam Hasan Azzam, 50, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
589. Unknown
590. Unknown

In case you are in Israel, and are thinking of protesting against these massacres, as has been recently done in London and elsewhere, here’s a report from Haifa (from Rann Bar-On, US lecturer on ‘holiday’):

I’m going to try to write up what I saw, heard, and experienced at the anti-war demonstration in the Carmel Center, Haifa on Saturday, July 19th 2014.  This was a difficult and traumatizing experience, one of the worst I have faced in over a decade of activism.  Please forgive rough writing. This is my point of view, and as such, is clouded.  I can only write what I saw and experienced.  All times are approximate.

9pm, opposite Ha’Agala Burekas restaurant, Moria Ave, Haifa: my partner and I are in my parents’ car, heading to the demonstration that is supposed to start at this location at 9:30.  As we drive up, we see a huge police presence, including armored horses, a water canon, and hundred of police.  Getting closer, we see what they’re there for: over a thousand right wing counter-protestors have showed up, chanting, waving Israeli and army flags, calling the left ‘traitors’.

9:05pm: We call the organizers, in a half-panic.  We’re told that the demo has been moved a few hundred yards down the street, nearer the Carmel Center.  As we’re walking, I see a policeman shoving a man with a sign supporting the left.  He’s bleeding.  We later find out he was punched in the face by one of the right wingers.

9:10pm, at the entrance to the Kababir neighborhood, Moria Ave: we arrive at the new site for the demonstration.  We’re practically alone with a ton of heavily armored police.  At this stage, it seems utterly irresponsible to encourage people to march.  Being outnumbered doesn’t begin to describe the situation we were in.  We head off to a nearby restaurant for a few minutes.

9:20pm: People are trickling in.  I walk around, trying to explain to folks there what I saw down the street (most people came from a different direction).  I’ve been an activist for many years, and have attended hundreds of demonstrations.  From experience, we can deal with the police, almost no matter what they do.  We can’t deal with huge numbers violent counter-demonstrators out to kill us.  A sense of bewilderment seems to be the dominant theme.

9:25pm: The main organizers ask us to move people into the adjacent park.  I ask people to do so, and for the most part, they do.  At this point, many counter-demonstrators have moved to stand opposite us, and are being held back by the police.  Chants of “Death to Arabs”, “Death to traitors”, “Death to leftists” come from the other side of the street.  Their numbers are swelling, fast.

9:30pm: We’re asked to move back onto the sidewalk from the park, as the police say they cannot protect us in the park.  With all that’s going, much of this gets lost.

9:45pm: Our side is swelling, but the other side is swelling faster. There are supposed to be buses arriving from other parts of the country.  We chant slogans for unity: “Jews and Arabs refuse to be enemies”; “Both in Gaza and in Sderot, children want to live”; “Peace isn’t built on childrens’ bodies”; “Gaza, stand strong, we’ll end the Occupation yet”; and many more.  Banners are raised. Red flags and Palestinians flags are waving.  The other side is jumping up and down, singing nationalist songs, waving Israeli and army brigade flags, all the time pushing against the police line.  Our side does not at all push against the police.  There’s no point: if the line were to be broken, we’d be facing a raving mob head on.

10pm: Buses should be arriving from other parts of the country.  They do not.  We get word that the police has blocked buses of our supporters from coming.

10:05pm: One bus arrives, barely.  It takes a long few minutes for the police to get the bus through the right wing folks.  When they pull up, I go over to greet them.  Turns out it was a bus from Nazareth.  Our ranks are swelled a bit more.  Still, we’re outnumbered, by a long shot.

Over the next thirty minutes or so, one more bus arrives.  We found out much later that four buses were blocked completely by the police.

10:45pm: By now, a few small scuffles have broken out between police and the counter-demonstrators.  A couple of them are arrested. Chanting keeps up on both sides.  We shout for life, they shout for death.  I stay as close to the front as I can, right up to the police line. Tempers flare here and there.

As a Jewish Israeli, it’s very very difficult for me to even consider trying to hold back Arab protesters.  It isn’t my place.  They have so much more to be angry about than I do.  Our privilege, being identified by the state as being Jewish, is huge.  Yet I seem to have taken on a role of responsibility, together with my Arab friends.  This is a tough paragraph to write.  I don’t want to appear arrogant.  Yet it seemed at the time that all our efforts were appreciated by those trying to keep others from getting badly hurt.

10:50pm: A couple of demonstrators from our side get snatched by police and arrested, violently.  Looking across the street, I see murder gleaming in the eyes of the fascists.  I don’t use that word lightly, but when a huge gang is quite literally calling for us to be killed, it’s appropriate, I think.

Much later, we find out that a few of our folks found themselves attacked by the right.  One broken nose, one broken shoulder.  Maybe more.

A few bottles are thrown on us.  Nothing much, at least not compared to what was to come later.

11pm: Someone decides to move into the neighborhood, away from the main street.  People are terrified, as the counter-demonstrators are still swelling and getting closer.  In principle, this should be the end of the demonstration.  The police allow some of the counter-demonstrators across the street, near the bus.  Other police try to herd some of our side onto the bus.  The bus is headed back to another town.  Police barely manage to get it out.

11:20pm: We’re trying to disperse.  Outside of the West Bank, where protests are suppressed with heavy crowd-control measures, I’ve never been to a demonstration where the hardest part is leaving.  A group of folks from Tel Aviv ask us to help them, to take them through the back streets to where their bus is.  They can’t find all their people.  We stand with them in a courtyard, with people trying to get through the back the building.  Suddenly, they come running back, shouting that the rightists are coming from behind.  Across the narrow side street, many of them have moved opposite us, shouting and gesturing.  Police are barely to be seen.

11:30pm: We move to the corner of the next street.  There are around 100 of us left at this point, as many somehow managed to escape, perhaps on a bus, perhaps in small groups on foot.  We can’t tell.  My partner and I agree that we’re not leaving until everyone is safe.  All three opposite corners, and quite a way down the streets, are covered with our opposition.  It’s a terrifying scene.  We’re surrounded.  Police are hanging out in the middle, looking utterly clueless.  Their horses and heavy machinery are nowhere to be seen.  For only the second time in my life, I’m wishing for police protection.

11:40pm: Stones start flying toward us.  Not many, but large.  We have older folks with us, some over 70.  We use the sticks holding our flags to try to deflect the stones like baseballs.  A few hit people.  People are bleeding.  Police look almost as scared as we are, and still, they do almost nothing to help us get the hell out.  They have helmets. Needless to say, we do not.

This doesn’t stop.  We chant those same slogans for unity: “Jews and Arabs refuse to be enemies”.  It seems so damn empty at this point, facing hundred of Zionist Jews who want to see us dead.  Not in jail. Dead.  I talk to a few people.  The word ‘pogrom’ starts being whispered.  These are highly experienced folks, for the most part, who do not use such words lightly.

Midnight: A policeman tells us to stand back.  In his words “there is going to be a mess here”.  A water cannon shows up.  Armored police horses show up.  I find myself almost relieved.  When the water cannon is shot right at one of the bunches of right wingers, a cheer goes up from our side.  Myself and few others shout at them to stay quiet: “We do NOT cheer police, ever!”

More stones.  More chants for murder.  We’re still trapped.  A few people try to push out to escape the hell we’re in.  They are pushed back by police and counter-demonstrators.

12:15am, July 20th: The police try to get us out.  People are throwing stones at us.  Again, not many, but they’re coming from all sides, including the buildings we’re passing by.  Police run into building entrances, pushing back those trying to attack us.  They’re barely successful.

I hear shouts and run toward them.  I see one of our people on the ground, bleeding from his head.  Police try to push us forward.  A couple of us tell them, trying to be calm, that we have someone injured.  A policeman says “fine, leave him there”.  We do nothing of the sort.  We pick him up. He’s ok, somehow.  Adrenaline, I suppose.

12:30am: We’re still half walking, half running down the street, surrounded by police.  It’s a bit calmer, but the counter-demonstrators (perhaps, by now, rioters) are still not far behind us.  We find ourselves at a traffic circle.  Two police commanders are arguing about what to do.  All we want is to get a bus.  They keep changing up where they want the bus to be.  I overhear one commander telling the other that there are another hundred rightists coming down the street.  They do not know what to do.  They order us further down the hill.

12:35am: The sidewalk ends on our side.  Police tell us to get into the shadows.  I hear one of them ordering a bus sent to us, empty, as fast as possible.  Nothing happens, everyone is exhausted.  They seem to holding back the counter-demonstrators up the street.

12:45am: A public bus is passing by with around six people aboard. Police stop the bus, tell everyone on it to leave, and shout at us to get on. We can’t believe this: the police have literally commandeered a bus.  It takes a while, but we all get on.  Eighty people packed like sardines onto a bus that holds fifty.  The bus moves up the hill to turn around.  As it does, it’s hit with a rock thrown  at it.

12:50am: We start singing.  People sing and laugh as the adrenaline starts to decline.  We feel safe, for the first time in hours.

1am:  As we head toward the shore, where another bus is waiting for us, a car covered with an Israeli flag pulls up.  The driver shouts and gestures at us.  This is our first hint that it’s not over yet.  Some still feel safe enough to flash V for victory signs at him.

1:05am: We pull into the parking lot behind the beach restaurant, Maxim.  We get off the bus.  We wonder where the next bus will take us.  One of the organizers tells us to get on, and we’ll sort that out later. The water cannon truck pulls in behind us, with a number of police vans.

1:15am: We’re on the bus, and we’re moving out of the parking lot.  The police accompaniment leaves.  We’re alone. Suddenly, we hear two or three rocks hitting the bus.  Two windows are shattered.  We push the broken glass out onto the street to avoid the pieces flying in due to wind and hitting passengers.  The broken windows make the bus windy, full of fresh air.  We’re tense, but we’re safe.

1:20am: The bus pulls up near the Haifa headquarters of the Hadash party, one of the main organizers.  As we disembark, we take photos of the youth making victory signs out the broken windows.  We’re safe.

1:30am: We go to headquarters to debrief, post reports, and decide on next steps.  At some point later, my partner and I go get some food and drinks for ourselves and our friends.

2:30am: We head to the police station to wait for the eight arrested to be released.  A somewhat surreal scene occurs when we encounter a demonstrator from the other side, doing the same.  No tempers flare.

4:30am: After two hours of waiting, talking, trying to understand what happened and why, our prisoners are released unconditionally.  We applaud.

We go home.  We sleep.

We were lucky: one stone an inch to one side or another, and someone would have died.  Quite a few people were injured.  One broken nose; one shattered shoulder.  One demonstrator hit in the head by police.  Who knows what else?

We live to fight another day.

 (See this video.)

DAY 94: Axis

July 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Just when I though I’d run out of things to worry about (rainforests, bees, floods, famine, England’s dismal performance in the World Cup), two sharp researchers at Nablus’s Al-Najah University presented me with something completely new. I quote:

‘Eng. Imad Al-Qasem and Dr. Abdul Razzaq Touqan have published a research article entitled: “Importance of Returning the Earth’s Axis to its Original Direction” in the International Journal of Geomatics and Geosciences (IJGGS). In the paper the researchers discuss the impact of the urban renaissance in the east, and specifically China, on the Sumatra earthquake in 2004 and the 2011 earthquake in Japan. These earthquakes have resulted in a deviation of the earth’s northern axis

axis

towards the south, which has led to an increased exposure of the northern hemisphere to the sun (where most of the earth’s inhabitants reside). In turn this exposure has led to thawing of the ice in the Arctic, heatwaves in Europe, the Middle East’s exposure to drought, and other dire and threatening consequences.’

Screen shot 2014-07-17 at 18.04.17‘Three Boys’, Murillo, Dulwich Picture Gallery. (Irrelevant to the current discussion.)

What’s particularly worrying about this waltzing behaviour of the earth is that we can’t, as with global warming, feel guilt about it. Whose fault were those earthquakes? Maybe it was the Chinese and their global renaissance. A part of me – the what-the-hell-i-won’t-live-to-see-it-anyway part – feels a) that the axis is probably shifting all the time, (or am I thinking of the magnetic pole?) b) that we live with a constant barrage of earthquakes in both hemispheres which must surely even out in the long run.

Books

This blog’s award for an Afghan novel whose heroine is a specialist in automorphic forms goes, surprisingly, to Khaled Hosseini’s And the Mountains Echoed. I felt particularly for the said heroine Pari, trying to get on with her Paris doctoral thesis with an innumerate alcoholic poet for a mother (not really her mother, sorry to give that away), and then realizing that automorphic forms also have applications in physics and topology. There’s inevitably a lot of stuff about the mujahideen and the Taliban, but you can skip that. Afghanistan is basically, in my opinion,

taverna-du-liban

Taverna du Liban, Lane 3, Street 14 Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul

nothing but a headache; having read that, as Stalin wisely said, ‘A nation is a historically constituted, stable community of people, formed on the basis of a common language, territory, economic life, and psychological make-up manifested in a common culture.’ I can’t see how these Tajiks, Balochs, Pashtos et al. ever managed to convince sophisticated writers like Mr Hosseini that they constituted a nation. (Of course the same argument applies to the U.K. Do Londoners and Glaswegians have a common psychological make-up? Or as Marx said in a different context, de te fabula narratur.)

The point where the author’s research has slipped up is in the depiction of Pari as having to give up her work on account of her rheumatoid arthritis. I know quite a bit about both number theory and rheumatoid arthritis (not at first hand), and while the condition can force you out of work if you’re a pastrycook or a pianist, it shouldn’t stop you from fiddling with abstractions. OK, typing would be a problem; but you can get round that. Look at how Prof Hawking (him again) gets by, doing really hard stuff on gravity with a bad case of MND.

 

Sport

A frustrating day refereeing the annual ‘Hedge Fund Managers vs. Human Rights Lawyers’ football fixture. (Why at this time of year?) As always, the hedge fund managers had taken forward positions in the ball’s future and were way overextended, while the human rights lawyers were arguing that the offside rule is a violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention. Given that football is rarely an armed conflict, I doubt they had much of a case. I had to allow the hedge fund managers a penalty on the no-arbitrage rule (which they missed, since the ball had been replaced by a collateralized derivative which is hard to hit with a boot). They called in the Feds, with whom they have predictably good relations; the lawyers appealed to the ICJ, and the game ended in an unseemly mêlée.

Poetry

We can call on Jalal-e-Din Rumi as an Afghan poet, since if I have my bearings right, he was born around those parts and wrote in Dari or Farsi or whatever you like to call it. So here, from the Kolliyaat-e-Shams-e-Tabrizi:

I’m not me, you’re not you, and you’re not me;

And yet I’m me, you’re you, and you are me.

Beauty of Khotan, I am this because of you:

Confused if I am you, or you are me.

 Confused? That was the point.
Music
Departing from the Afghan theme, and not particularly related to our worries about the earth’s axis, here
is the Modern Jazz Quartet’s classic 1959 recording ‘Django’. If you can remember when this came out, good health to you.

DAY 93 – Gaza

July 16th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

In a deluge of dispatches, which you are probably reading as I am, I select this, from the Palestine Israel Network:

A Contextual Reflection on the Assault on Gaza

Written on July 12, 2014 by  (American Episcopalian)

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? The frightening aerial war being waged by Israel against Gaza brings many recriminations and much finger pointing. Who started this? What incident set it off? The kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teenagers in the occupied West Bank? Or the earlier murders of two Palestinian teens involving Israeli snipers which went largely unreported because such incidents are so common? Or the revenge murder against a Palestinian teenager who was burned alive? Is it rockets fired from Gaza into Israel or is that retaliation for a drone strike by Israel on Gaza? It’s the same scenario played out for decades. Tit for tat is the common refrain. In the context of all that is going on in Syria and Iraq, the Middle East appears to be a cauldron.

LI-Goya-plate20b-150x150Get him well, and on to the next

Pierre Whalon, bishop-in-charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, wrote on July 10: “An Israeli invasion of Gaza could be the match that sets off the powder keg…. It is therefore crucial that people of faith not only pray fervently, but also contact their governments’ leaders to demand that every possible effort be made to prevent a conflagration which could even spill over into a Third World War.” That’s a pretty grim prognostication. And a necessary encouragement to contact our government to exercise its considerable influence.

One thing is certain. As with previous assaults by Israel on Gaza, there is no proportionality in either the firepower of the two sides, nor its devastating consequences. So far, over 100 Palestinians have died, mostly civilians, including women and children, but not one Israeli. Diane Sawyer of ABC news committed a gaffe in reporting on the conflict, showing a displaced family among the rubble of what was their home, referring to it as an Israeli family. But it was actually a Palestinian family in Gaza. No Israeli homes have been destroyed. Brian Williams of NBC news, on the other hand, accurately reported on the “lopsided” nature of the attacks.   He noted most of the rockets fired from Gaza into Israel are shot down by a largely U.S. taxpayer funded Iron Dome which intercepts incoming missiles. But Israel’s bombs are the most sophisticated money can buy and Gaza has no defense against them.

There are 1.8 million Palestinians in Gaza, crammed into poverty stricken cities and refugee camps that have been there since the end of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. Unemployment is 40%. Israel controls Gaza on three sides with a desolate border fence and a navy blockade. Israel destroyed Gaza’s airport in an aerial assault years ago. Egypt controls the southern border and has no desire to absorb Palestinians into their country. Gaza is often described by its residents as an open air prison. It is part of the ongoing Occupation of 4.4 million Palestinians. And it is one of the most densely populated pieces of land in the world. And one of the poorest.

LI-Goya-Plate32b-150x150

Why?

Israelis living in the modern city of Tel Aviv 43 miles north of Gaza can live their lives without ever thinking about the conditions of life in Gaza. Until now. All of a sudden, air raid sirens are going off and people have 15 minutes to seek shelter because Hamas now has a few longer range rockets.  One angry Tel Aviv woman screamed “We must wipe out Hamas once and for all.” One Hamas spokesperson said Hamas was achieving its purpose, to get the attention of Israelis and to strike fear.

In contrast, one angry elderly Palestinian man in Gaza screamed over the rubble where nine Palestinian bodies lay “We are not people! They do not see us as people!” The nine dead were young men who had gathered to watch the World Cup at the ironically named Fun Time café. The café was obliterated. “It was a normal social occasion,a local policeman employed by the Palestinian Authority, Wael Soboh, told Agence France Presse.“The boys ate their Ramadan iftar meal here, and then began watching the match. It is not a military area.” Israel later said it was targeting one alleged terrorist.

LI-Goya-plate38b-150x150Barbarians!

Hamas in Gaza is largely an outgrowth of 66 years of a teeming mass of humanity that has as bleak an outlook as the barren place it is. Gaza is a breeding ground for rage and violence, and it’s directly proportional to the draconian conditions Israel applies. Hamas stands defiantly against the State of Israel for having displaced 750,000 Palestinians in 1948 from what is now Israel, wiping out over 400 Palestinian villages and towns. The creation of the State of Israel is known to Palestinians as the Nakba, the catastrophe. Israel says it will not negotiate with Hamas until Hamas recognizes Israel’s right to exist, accepts the (moribund) Oslo accords and renounces violence. So Hamas must give away its main bargaining chips before it can get a seat at the table while Israel says it will not agree to any preconditions. Yitzhak Rabin, former Prime Minister of Israel, assassinated by an Israeli extremist for making a peace agreement with Yasser Arafat was quoted as saying “You don’t make peace with your friends. You make peace with your enemies.” Is there any option to Israel and Hamas eventually sitting down to make peace? Does the Tel Aviv woman really believe Hamas can be wiped out?

In the midst of the current war in Gaza, a remarkable event occurred in Tel Aviv on July 8. The White House Middle East chief, Philip Gordon, spoke to an Israeli audience moments after the conference participants returned from taking cover during an air raid warning. He said, “How will (Israel) have peace if it’s unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupation and allow for Palestinian sovereignty, security and dignity? How will we prevent other states from supporting Palestinian efforts in international bodies, if Israel is not seen as committed to peace?”

LI-Goya-plate54b-150x150Appeals are in vain

This is a sign of the U.S. administration’s frustration with the recent failure of peace talks largely because of Israel’s defiance of international law in pursuing its settlement expansion in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, which has continued with impunity for decades. It may also be a sign of the shifting political landscape where previously blind eyes are now beginning to see Israel’s intransigence and willingness to maintain its occupation in perpetuity, the world be damned.

Israel’s latest assault on Gaza is a tragic display of firepower that is inflicting mayhem and death mainly on innocent civilians, including children, which substitutes for any perceived desire to end the occupation. That’s the refrain Israel doesn’t want to hear. End the occupation.

Canon Brian J. Grieves

Steering Committee, Palestine Israel Network

The Episcopal Peace Fellowship

Poems:

I, too, have a dream …
that one day Jews and Christians
will see me as I am:
a small child, lonely and afraid,
staring down the barrels of their big bazookas,
knowing I did nothing
to deserve their enmity.
―The Child Poets of Gaza

I, too, have a dream …
that one day Jews and Christians
will see me as I am:
a small child, lonely and afraid,
staring down the barrels of their big bazookas,
knowing I did nothing
to deserve their emnity.
―The Child Poets of Gaza

Epitaph for a Child of Gaza
by Michael R. Burch

I lived as best I could, and then I died.
Be careful where you step: the grave is wide.

 

Distant light
by Walid Khazindar, a poet born in Gaza City
loose translation by Michael R. Burch

Bitterly cold,
winter clings to the naked trees.
If only you would free
the bright sparrows
from the tips of your fingers
and release a smile—that shy, tentative smile—
from the imprisoned anguish I see.
Sing! Can we not sing
as if we were warm, hand-in-hand,
shielded by shade from a glaring sun?
Can you not always remain this way,
stoking the fire, more beautiful than necessary, and silent?
Darkness increases; we must remain vigilant
and this distant light is our only consolation—
this imperiled flame, which from the beginning
has been flickering,
in danger of going out.
Come to me, closer and closer.
I don’t want to be able to tell my hand from yours.
And let’s stay awake, lest the snow smother us.

 

And to round it off: ‘Greek Songs for Gaza‘ – with English and Arabic subtitles.

The report on my refereeing stint for the annual ‘Hedge Fund Managers vs. Human Rights Lawyers’ football fixture is unavoidably held over till the next post.

 

 

DAY 92: Analytic light

July 5th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Those of us who are or have been in analysis, probably most of this column’s well-heeled readers, may have sometimes wondered about what it does to time – compare relativity, if you like. As you all know, » Read the rest of this entry «